Finding calm in the chaos: Meet Veena Krishna, catastrophic claims analyst

They work to meet the diverse and ever-changing needs of customers and employees. They adapt and innovate, expand their expertise to enrich the lives of those around them. They are passionate and driven.

In this four-part series, we introduce you to some of the unique roles and employees behind the scenes at TD helping to deliver for customers and communities.


Veena Krishna will go where disaster strikes—and where customers need her most.

"You get into this mode of helping people because you want to do what's right," she says.

Her job as a catastrophic claims analyst can be rewarding, but challenging. It requires addressing the financial needs of insurance customers impacted by disastrous weather events—like flooding or wildfires—that have left their homes, vehicles and personal possessions damaged or even destroyed.

It involves finding answers when those impacted ask 'What do I do now?'

"That very moment when a customer asks for assistance, you can only imagine what they are going through," says Krishna. "Your job is to support that individual and their loved ones any way you can."

READ: Meet Jennifer Popkey, Sign Language Interpreter

In 2016, after devastating wildfires forced 80,000 to evacuate in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Krishna worked with the Mobile Response Unit to provide individuals and families left homeless access to emergency funds or temporary accommodations.

"A lot of houses were completely destroyed and for the homes that were somewhat salvaged, people weren't allowed to go back right away," she says.

Day-to-day, Krishna's office in Calgary is a standard, typical workspace, but when a disaster hits, Krishna and other team members attend to customers' needs in a different environment—a Mobile Response Unit often stationed in the affected area.

"During Fort McMurray, 14-hour long workdays meant that for two weeks the motor home became home," she says.

TD's Mobile Response Unit

For Krishna, it also meant being able to communicate with people on a more personal level.

"Many customers would walk in visibly upset—some would break down and cry," she states. "It was that face-to-face interaction though that I believed helped make the process a bit easier."

Krishna says her main concern was to ensure customers were safe, informed and reassured that they had a trusted place to seek advice and support.

"Everyone has different needs but in the end, they are all just looking for answers and some help."


Part 1: Angeli, design researcher  | Part 2: Jennifer, ASL Interpreter | Part 3: Veena, claims analyst | Part 4: Julie, head of TD Innovation Center